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Biological It's not easy being green tomatoes
Uniform ripening Encodes a Golden 2-like Transcription Factor Regulating Tomato Fruit Chloroplast Development.  Powell et al. 
 
When shopping for tomatoes, people often look for a uniform scarlet hue.  Plant breeders have selected for plants that have uniform light green fruit that will develop the characteristic...

annotations posted 09/04/2015
original paper published 06/29/2012

Biological A stroke of genesis in the brain
A latent neurogenic program in astrocytes regulated by Notch signaling in the mouse.  Magnusson et al. 
 
Astrocytes, a type of glial cell in the brain, were originally considered to be “brain glue,” with the chief role of supporting neurons.  In this report, scientists take a second look at the function of astrocytes.  Specifically, they demonstrate that...

annotations posted 08/21/2015
original paper published 10/10/2014

Biological Cells mix things up by actively stirring their insides
High-resolution mapping of intracellular fluctuations using carbon nanotubes.  Fakhri et al.  
 
All organisms are composed of one or more living cells. The human body contains trillions of cells, yet we do not understand the behavior of even one single cell on its own. To keep...

annotations posted 08/07/2015
original paper published 05/30/2014

Biological A shoot full of sugar helps the flowering begin
Regulation of Flowering by Trehalose-6-Phosphate Signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana Wahl et al.  
 
Flowers are structures used by many, but not all, plants to reproduce, i.e., to combine egg and sperm.  Making flowers is a costly process, and for plants like Arabidopsis, which flower once and then die, the stakes are especially high—they...

annotations posted 07/24/2015
original paper published 02/08/2013

Physical Does Earth have a sixth ocean?
Dehydration melting at the top of the lower mantle.  Schmandt et al.  
 
Water present on the surface of the Earth is easy to find and measure.  What about the water we can't see?  Scientists have always thought that massive amounts of water might exist deep beneath the Earth's surface, but they never knew how to measure this. To complicate things, water...

annotations posted 07/10/2015
original paper published 06/13/2014

Biological How unique are today’s temperatures?
A reconstruction of regional and global temperature for the past 11,300 years.  Marcott et al.
 
Today’s fossil fuel use drives a global climate experiment: how much will global temperatures rise as a result of carbon emissions? To answer this question, scientists need to understand processes that cause global temperatures to vary in the absence of emissions...

annotations posted 06/24/2015
original paper published 03/08/2013

Biological Stop! Codon time!
Stop codon reassignments in the wild.  Ivanova et al.  
 
A central idea in genetics is that all microbes follow the same genetic code when producing proteins.  What happens when organisms start to use this universal vocabulary in a different way?  The authors of this paper...

annotations posted 06/12/2015
original paper published 05/23/2014

Physical Twist and shout
Artificial Muscles from Fishing Line and Sewing Thread. Haines et al.
 
Artificial muscles have many potential applications, such as muscle transplantation and use in humanoid robots, but are currently expensive and inefficient. Haines et al. found a way to decrease the cost of artificial muscle synthesis by designing them out of common, inexpensive...

annotations posted 05/29/2015
original paper published 11/20/2014

Biological Shape shifters of the plant world
Leaf Shape Evolution Through Duplication, Regulatory Diversification, and Loss of a Homeobox Gene.  Vlad et al.
 
Why do different species look different?  The full answer generally involves complicated interactions of many genes, but some particular differences can be traced to a single gene or a single region of the...

annotations posted 05/15/2015
original paper published 02/14/2014

Biological The original GPS: how we remember what happened where
Neural Activity in Human Hippocampal Formation Reveals the Spatial Context of Retrieved Memories.  Miller et al.
 
Think about your childhood best friend. Do you remember when you first met? You might remember that you sat next to each other in class or in the lunchroom, or that you shared an interest in the same hobby, like riding bikes. If you went to the...

annotations posted 05/01/2015
original paper published 03/20/2015

Pages

Biological It's not easy being green tomatoes
Uniform ripening Encodes a Golden 2-like Transcription Factor Regulating Tomato Fruit Chloroplast Development.  Powell et al. 
 
When shopping for tomatoes, people often look for a uniform scarlet hue.  Plant breeders have selected for plants that have uniform light green fruit that will develop the characteristic...

annotations posted 09/04/2015
original paper published 06/29/2012

Biological A stroke of genesis in the brain
A latent neurogenic program in astrocytes regulated by Notch signaling in the mouse.  Magnusson et al. 
 
Astrocytes, a type of glial cell in the brain, were originally considered to be “brain glue,” with the chief role of supporting neurons.  In this report, scientists take a second look at the function of astrocytes.  Specifically, they demonstrate that...

annotations posted 08/21/2015
original paper published 10/10/2014

Biological Cells mix things up by actively stirring their insides
High-resolution mapping of intracellular fluctuations using carbon nanotubes.  Fakhri et al.  
 
All organisms are composed of one or more living cells. The human body contains trillions of cells, yet we do not understand the behavior of even one single cell on its own. To keep...

annotations posted 08/07/2015
original paper published 05/30/2014

Biological A shoot full of sugar helps the flowering begin
Regulation of Flowering by Trehalose-6-Phosphate Signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana Wahl et al.  
 
Flowers are structures used by many, but not all, plants to reproduce, i.e., to combine egg and sperm.  Making flowers is a costly process, and for plants like Arabidopsis, which flower once and then die, the stakes are especially high—they...

annotations posted 07/24/2015
original paper published 02/08/2013

Physical Does Earth have a sixth ocean?
Dehydration melting at the top of the lower mantle.  Schmandt et al.  
 
Water present on the surface of the Earth is easy to find and measure.  What about the water we can't see?  Scientists have always thought that massive amounts of water might exist deep beneath the Earth's surface, but they never knew how to measure this. To complicate things, water...

annotations posted 07/10/2015
original paper published 06/13/2014

Biological How unique are today’s temperatures?
A reconstruction of regional and global temperature for the past 11,300 years.  Marcott et al.
 
Today’s fossil fuel use drives a global climate experiment: how much will global temperatures rise as a result of carbon emissions? To answer this question, scientists need to understand processes that cause global temperatures to vary in the absence of emissions...

annotations posted 06/24/2015
original paper published 03/08/2013

Biological Stop! Codon time!
Stop codon reassignments in the wild.  Ivanova et al.  
 
A central idea in genetics is that all microbes follow the same genetic code when producing proteins.  What happens when organisms start to use this universal vocabulary in a different way?  The authors of this paper...

annotations posted 06/12/2015
original paper published 05/23/2014

Physical Twist and shout
Artificial Muscles from Fishing Line and Sewing Thread. Haines et al.
 
Artificial muscles have many potential applications, such as muscle transplantation and use in humanoid robots, but are currently expensive and inefficient. Haines et al. found a way to decrease the cost of artificial muscle synthesis by designing them out of common, inexpensive...

annotations posted 05/29/2015
original paper published 11/20/2014

Biological Shape shifters of the plant world
Leaf Shape Evolution Through Duplication, Regulatory Diversification, and Loss of a Homeobox Gene.  Vlad et al.
 
Why do different species look different?  The full answer generally involves complicated interactions of many genes, but some particular differences can be traced to a single gene or a single region of the...

annotations posted 05/15/2015
original paper published 02/14/2014

Biological The original GPS: how we remember what happened where
Neural Activity in Human Hippocampal Formation Reveals the Spatial Context of Retrieved Memories.  Miller et al.
 
Think about your childhood best friend. Do you remember when you first met? You might remember that you sat next to each other in class or in the lunchroom, or that you shared an interest in the same hobby, like riding bikes. If you went to the...

annotations posted 05/01/2015
original paper published 03/20/2015

Pages